Monday, December 10, 2012

Genre Immersion


Last month I posted about books with male MCs. As I was revising my own novel with a male MC I had been reading lots of these books. And I received some great recommendations in the comments. Thanks, Suze, for telling me about The Cardturner by Louis Sachar. I read it, loved it, and have been hesitant to bring my copy back to the library because I want to read it again!




The project I'm working on now is a humorous contemporary YA romance. Sometimes I find myself loosing the thread of the story and becoming too serious. That's when I need to immerse myself in lighthearted reading. Some of my favorites so far have been Eileen Cook's, The Education of Hailey Kendrick and Janette Rallison's, Just One Wish.  Do you have any recommendations for me?


How much of what you read is in the genre you write?




25 comments:

  1. I try to read the genre I'm currently writing. It really helps me stay in the right mindset.

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  2. I write YA and NA (new adult), so I read mostly in those genres. But since they aren't technically genres, I do read widely. I have, lately, been sticking to YA and NA contempories. But that's because I'm burned out on paranormals and dystopians. I'll read YA horrors, thrillers, and suspense, as long as there's a hint of romance.

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  3. I usually read books in the genre I'm writing, but only before writing the manuscript and then again before revising the manuscript. I don't know why; it's just what works best for me! LOL Maybe it just helps get me in the right mind set.

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  4. I read mostly in the genre I'm writing - middle grade. However, reading YA and Adult fiction is what I read for my own enjoyment. I find reading a variety of genres helps keep my writing fresh. Good luck, Ruth!

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  5. Oh Ruth, I'm knee-deep into "heavy hearted" MG & YA, so sorry not to be able to pass the lighter kind. Maybe I should lighten up... Y’think? (^-)

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  6. Humorous contemporary YA romance, cool! I look forward to reading that when it's published. I'm all over the place with my reading. I have a hard time with horror, but I don't always know it's coming if it's listed as a psychological thriller. Yeah, I'm kind of naive. Those horror pieces always make my heart pound and leave me feeling a sense of dread. I love humor, but my mind is drawing a blank as far as a recommendation for you. Louis Sachar is awesome. I love Jack Gantos, too. He's hilarious.

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  7. I read a lot of MG and YA, just like I write. But while I write contemporary fantasy, I have a more diverse reading selection. There's a lot of great non-fantasy fiction out there.

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  8. You couldn't have chosen a better author for boy's voice. I also love Spinelli.

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  9. I read the books I write, primarily MG fiction, with a preference of animal fantasy, but I also read need picture books and a few chapter books (Things I'm not ready to write myself...).

    I also read a select mix of nonfiction and poetry, but again, not yet able to write them yet.

    My tastes in reading are WAY broader than what I write overall.

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  10. I read A LOT in the genre I write (PBs) and a lot in the genre I hope to write (YA). I love Sideways Stories From Wayside School and Holes by Louis Sachar, but never heard of this one. I will definitely have to check it out!

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  11. I read lots of historical fiction because that's what I most love to write. I don't read many books with male protagonists and the ones I have read don't tend to be humorous. John Green often has male protagonists, and I love WHERE SHE WENT by Gayle Forman which has a male protagonist, but is definitely not humorous.

    What about Richard Peck's books? He's always humorous. The Teacher's Funeral comes to mind.

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  12. Since blogging, I'm all over the map with the kind of books I read. I don't stick to my genre, but that's the beauty of reading and writing. Seeing things from different angles.

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  13. It is so easy for me to write with emotion and be too serious. It's an art/gift to show humor. Your friend gave you a great suggestion. A different perspective has a way of opening one up to something new.

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  14. Stephanie Perkins' books are lighter YA. Lola and the Boy Next Door is one title. :)

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  15. I LOVE Louis Sachar, and The Cardturner was a gem. Have you read any of his Wayside School books? It's a series about zany things that happen to students at a school that was supposed to be built with 30 classrooms next to each other, but instead was built with the classrooms on top of one another--a 30-story school. Very funny MG series.

    I recently read and was very entertained by Peter and the Starcatchers by Dave Barry (the humor columnist) and Ridley Pearson. It's a prequel to Peter Pan.

    If you're looking for great male voices, read some Chris Crutcher and Rich Wallace too.

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  16. I really loved Just One Wish. I can see how it might be tough to get off topic or to tend to get preachy. Humor really helps readers become sympathetic.

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  17. 'The Education of Hailey Kendrick' sounds like a book I'd love to read. Thanks for sharing! I read lots of books in the genre I'm writing, but I also take breaks through non-fiction and adult fiction so that I can still find my voice (rather than subconsciously adopt the voices of all the MG novels I'm currently reading).

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  18. I'm the same way. If my funny characters aren't being funny enough, I go back and reread some Douglas Adams to get into the right goofy mindset.

    For light YA, I would recommend Mandy Hubbard's and Sara Mlynowski's books.

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  19. Pretty much EVERYTHING I read is in the genre I write. I love fantasy, so I tend to read EVERYTHING fantasy. :)

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  20. I love funny/scary things like "Buffy" and have always wished I could write like that. Sadly, I'm just better at straight adventure/horror.
    Good luck with your comedy -- sounds like it's coming out great! :-)

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  21. Ooh, I loved The Cardturner, too! I'm mostly reading MG these days, so I don't have anything to recommend. But best of luck with your writing!

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  22. I read mostly MG since that's what I write but I throw in occasional YA to remind myself of where my characters will end up in a few years. :-) I love when authors can blend humor with super-serious, and do it convincingly. Gary D. Schmidt is a master with this. Okay for Now is perhaps his very best example.

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  23. I loved The Cardturner! Yep, I write MG; I read MG. Just finished Malcolm at Midnight (loved it) and am just starting Chained.

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  24. I'd a sucker for funny stories... thanks for sharing some new YA stories with male MCs... been trying to find some new ones:)

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  25. Cardturner was wonderful. And, yes, the only way to get through the grieving is to let it happen. It's uneven. It's painful. Above all, it's necessary.

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